Chapter 3 - Standard III: Faculty

Introduction

The GSLIS Organizational Goals and Objectives discussed in Chapter  1 are related to the evaluation of faculty, facilities, administrative support and services to students. Achievement of these Organizational Goals & Objectives helps to ensure compliance with the related ALA Standards. Organizational Goals and Objectives related to Standard III are discussed in this chapter.

GSLIS Organizational Goal 2 (Related to ALA Standard III)

Objectives:

2.1.   GSLIS faculty maintain active programs of scholarly and creative production and seek appropriate institutional and external support

2.2.   Faculty, where appropriate, publish their research and present their scholarship/creative productions in venues with transnational reach.

2.3.   Faculty are represented in professional organizations and committees both nationally and internationally.

2.4.   GSLIS achieves demographic and scholarly diversity of its faculty, where appropriate, through faculty recruitment policies.

2.5.   Faculty are routinely evaluated and advised in areas of scholarship, teaching and professional responsibilities. Adjunct teaching faculty are assessed every semester.

2.6.   GSLIS faculty create teaching and research partnerships across departmental and divisional boundaries.

2.7.   GSLIS has a forum for the dissemination of student and faculty creative accomplishments.

GSLIS is doing well in achieving these objectives and maintaining compliance with the elements of Standard III. As shown in this chapter, GSLIS faculty have high scholarly productivity, have regional, national and international visibility and demonstrate teaching excellence across a wide range of specializations. GSLIS has been effective in planning for future hiring needs and successful in securing and filling new faculty lines to begin in AY 2014/15.

Competing pressures from heavy teaching, research and service commitments remain an issue that GSLIS is addressing directly with Queens College Administration, with positive results in recent years. The unique structure of the GSLIS as department and standalone graduate school creates additional work responsibilities that heretofore have not been full recognized by the Administration. As a result of more focused communication between the and Director/Chair and the Dean and Provost about GSLIS's unique needs, GSLIS faculty now receive additional compensation and course release for service work, most notably in areas of graduate admissions and vice chair responsibilities. Additional funding has been granted for administrative support, assessment research and IT support as well. This is further discussed below and in Chapter 5.

Standard III.1

Standard III.1

The school has a faculty capable of accomplishing program objectives. Full-time faculty members are qualified for appointment to the graduate faculty within the parent institution and are sufficient in number and in diversity of specialties to carry out the major share of the teaching, research, and service activities required for a program, wherever and however delivered. Part-time faculty, when appointed, balance and complement the teaching competencies of the full-time faculty. Particularly in the teaching of specialties that are not represented in the expertise of the full-time faculty, part-time faculty, enrich the quality and diversity of a program.

Full-time Faculty

In Fall 2014, there will be ten full-time faculty in the Graduate School of Library & Information Studies (GSLIS) and by spring 2015 there will be eleven. All of the full-time faculty, with ranks from Assistant Professor to Full Professor, hold Ph.D. degrees (Table III.1 “Faculty By Rank and Highest Degree.”). Since the last Program Presentation, two new faculty lines at the rank of Assistant Professor have been granted to the School. GSLIS has hired one new faulty member, Lucia Cedeira Serantes, who will join the faculty as an Assistant Professor in the Fall 2014 semester.  Our second new hire, Shuheng Wu, will join the faculty in January 2015, at the rank of Assistant Professor, contingent upon her completion of the Ph.D.

Faculty curricula vitae (Appendix III.1) demonstrate the variety of institutions where Ph.D. degrees have been earned, including two from countries other than the United States.  Historically, a large percentage of our faculty earned their advanced degrees from schools in New York City and its environs. As a result of more widespread recruiting in recent years, as well as greater national and international visibility of GSLIS faculty, more recent applicants and subsequent hires have come from Ph.D. granting institutions outside the New York metropolitan area. Our two new hires have their Ph.D. degrees from the University of Western Ontario, and Florida State University.

 

Name

Rank

Highest Degree

AY Hired

Brody

Full

Ph.D. Rutgers

1996

Cedeira-Serantes

Assistant

Ph.D. UWO

2014

Chelton

Full

Ph.D. Rutgers

1998

Cool

Full

Ph.D. Rutgers

1997

Cooper

Associate

Ph.D. Rutgers

2007

Kibirige

Full

Ph.D. Pittsburgh

1985

Li

Associate

Ph.D. McGill

2006

Marcum

Full

Ph.D. UNC

2011

Ng

Full

Ph.D. Rutgers

1999

Perry

Associate

Ph.D. Rutgers

2001

Wu

Assistant, upon Ph.D.

ABD, Florida State U

Hired for Spring 2015

Table III.1: GSLIS Full time Faculty as of September 2014: Rank and Highest Degree

The City University of New York (CUNY) By-Laws, section 11.5 (Appendix III.2), state that a Ph.D., or the equivalent, is required for all ranks (Assistant to Full) unless otherwise specified in the document. Based upon these guidelines, the GSLIS faculty have met the basic appointment qualifications of the CUNY and Standard III.1. The teaching competencies/specialties listed in Tables III.2 and III.3 show that the “faculty evidence diversity of backgrounds …… and specialized knowledge covering program content.”  In combination with the contribution of our strong professional cadre of adjuncts, the faculty is capable of accomplishing the program objectives of the GSLIS.


 

Name

Rank

Teaching Competencies/Specialties

Research Areas

Brody

Full

 

Digital Humanities and Humanities Research, Business Research, Competitive Intelligence, Reference and Information Services

Business Information and Competitive Intelligence, Social Informatics, American Popular Culture, Geo-located Information

Cedeira-Serantes

Assistant

Young Adult Materials, Reference Services, Collection Development

Young Adult Readers, Comics and Graphic Novels, Youth Literacy

Chelton

Full

Young Adult Materials/Services, Readers Advisory Services for Adults, Reference & Information Services, Research Methods

YA Services, YA Demographics, Reading, Readers Advisory Services, Information Seeking of Young Adults, Adoption Searchers, Intellectual Freedom, Discourse in LIS

Cool

Full

Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Research Methods, Internship

 

Human-Computer Interaction, Information Seeking Behavior, Digital Libraries, Interactive Information Retrieval

Cooper, L.

Associate

School Library Media Centers, Children’s Information Behavior, Children’s Book Art, Internship

Children’s Information Behavior, Visual Information, Visual Literacy, Cognitive Categories for Information

Kibirige

Full

Information Systems Design, Information Technology, Computer & Telecommunications Networks, Web Design, Research

Computer & Telecommunications Networks, Information Use

Li, P.

Associate

Reference and Information Services, Information Literacy and Instruction, Science and Technology Librarianship, Research Methods

Reference and Information Services, Information Literacy and Information Literacy Instruction, Users and Uses of Information Systems, Health Science Librarianship

Marcum

Full

 

Academic Libraries, Library Management

Library Sustainability, Strategic Planning and Leadership, Inquiry Learning

Ng

Full

Technical Services, Information Technologies, Metadata Standards, Web Programming, Digital Archives

Information Retrieval, Human Computer Interaction, Knowledge Organization and Representation In Digital Environments, Metadata Standards for Resource Descriptions, Computational Linguistics, Data Fusion

Perry

Associate

Digitization, Digital Libraries, Fundamentals of LIS

Digitization Principles and Practices, New Technologies for Digital Libraries and Digital collections, Information Technologies & the Curriculum, Information Needs of Diverse Populations

Wu

TBD in January 2015

Knowledge Organization, Metadata Standards, Data Curation

Knowledge Organization, Metadata Schema, Scientific Data Practices

Table III.2:  Teaching Competencies/Specialties and Research Areas of Full-Time Faculty: Fall 2014

Adjunct faculty play an important role in complementing the competencies and specialties of current full time faculty. Table III.3 below lists the competencies and specialties of adjunct faculty who regularly teach in our program. Information about the current outside appointments of these adjunct faculty can be found in Appendix III.3.

Name

Teaching Competencies/Specialties

 Degree

Barnes

Records Management, Corporate Archives

MLS, CRM

Basileo

School Library Media

MLS, MS

Behar

Cataloging, Technical Services

MLS, Post -Master’s Certificate

Bright

Library Management; School Library Media

MLS

Caniano

School Library Media

MLS

DeCandido

Archives, Digital Preservation

MLS

Friedman

Library Management

PhD, MLS

Gordh

Children’s Services; Storytelling

MFA

Grevin

Archives; Digital Preservation; Record Management

Licence e Lettres (France)

Husain

Information Technology

MLS, MS

Jackson

Public Libraries; Multicultural Librarianship

 MLS

Lawton

Academic Libraries, Library Management

MLS, MA

Mellone

Reference, General and Social Science

MLS

Rosenblum

School Library Media

MLS

Stumm

Archives, Preservation, Museum Collection Development

MLS

Smith

Children and YA Materials; Services to Children

Ph.D. (Professor emeritus)

Thayer

Archival Appraisal; Special Collections

MLS, PhD (ABD status)

Tice

YA Materials and Services

MLS

Yearwood

Academic Libraries, User Services

MLS, MS

Table III.3:  Teaching Competencies/Specialties and Highest Degree: Part-Time Faculty

Please note that the table titled Faculty Research & Publications: Since Date of Hire, which appears in Section III.5 of this chapter, summarizes the tangible and recorded research achievements of the faculty. Details of this summary evidence of the “ability to conduct research in the field” may be found in the faculty curricula vitae (Appendix III.1).

Course Coverage

The GSLIS faculty is sufficient in number and diversity of specialties to accomplish the School’s goals and objectives.  Tables III.2 and III.3 demonstrate that the full and adjunct faculty of the GSLIS are sufficient and capable of teaching the diversity of specialties needed to accomplish Program Goals. Adjunct faculty are most valuable in providing specialized knowledge and experience required in many of our elective courses.  They contribute heavily to the success of the GSLIS’s two Certificate programs, as well as to the LMS programs for certified and non-certified teachers.

Full time GSLIS faculty regularly teach core courses (LBSCI 700; 701; 702; 703; 709) within the program. LBSCI 709, the capstone research project, is never taught by adjunct faculty. Table III.4, below, shows the total number of core courses, including LBSCI 709, taught each semester for AY 2011-2012 to AY 2013-2014, and the numbers and percentages taught by full-time and adjunct faculty, excluding summer session. Since the full-time faculty are on annual leave from the end of Spring semester until the start of Fall semester, summer session teaching assignments are usually dominated by adjuncts. This table shows that GSLIS students are receiving core course instruction primarily from full time faculty. For two years LBSCI 703, Introduction to Technical Services, has been taught solely by an adjunct. However, in January 2015 newly hired Assistant Professor Wu will be an additional full time faculty member who will teach in this area.

Year and Semester

Core and Required Courses

Faculty

Adjunct

Full Time Faculty

Adjunct Faculty

2011, Fall

18

10

8

55.56%

44.44%

2012, Spring

21

13

8

61.90%

38.10%

2012, Fall

14

7

7

50.00%

50.00%

2013, Spring

11

9

2

81.82%

18.18%

2013, Fall

11

7

4

63.64%

36.36%

2014, Spring

11

6

5

54.55%

45.45%

Total

86

52

34

60.47%

39.53%

Table III.4 Core and Required Courses Taught by Fulltime and Adjunct Faculty

The declining number of core courses offered since fall 2012 reflects the downturn in admissions and enrollment, a general trend across LIS school in New York City (see Table IV.1 in Chapter 4) In addition, GSLIS suffered a decline in enrollment immediately following news of its Conditional Accreditation status in January 2012, and news of possible withdrawal of its accreditation in May 2013.

Graduate Advisors

There are three Graduate Advisors at GSLIS: the Graduate Advisor for Admissions, the Graduate Advisor for Continuing Students, and the Graduate Advisor for LMS and Coordinator of the LMS Programs. Their specific duties may be found in the document Duties of the Graduate Advisors (Appendices III.29 and III.30). Their work includes, but is not limited to, counseling, guidance and assistance with transfer and admission, re-entry, acting as an ombudsman for students with academic difficulties, and reviewing graduation approval forms from the Registrar. To accomplish this, they maintain connections and interact with other entities within and outside of the college, most notably the office of Graduate Admissions and the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Faculty Workload

Full- time faculty at senior colleges in the City University of New York (CUNY) are contractually required to teach seven (7) courses per academic year.  Faculty who are actively engaged in research or service are usually given one course release per Academic Year.  This means that for most faculty, the effective teaching load is six (6) courses per year.  In addition, Graduate Advisors are given one course release per semester. Thus, their course load is four (4) courses per year. Chairs receive two course releases per semester plus additional compensation in the summer.

Effective September 1, 2006, new tenure track faculty have been given and continue to receive eight ‘course releases’ -- release time equivalent to (8) courses which can be used during their first five years, with the agreement of the departmental Director/Chair and Dean (Appendix III.4 CUNY Contract).  The tenure track timeline is seven years.

Annual leave for full-time faculty begins the day after graduation in the Spring and ends the day before classes begin in the Fall semester. Summer teaching is optional and those who teach during the Summer semester receive additional compensation. 

Standard III.2

Standard III.2     

The school demonstrates the high priority it attaches to teaching, research, and service by its appointments and promotions; by encouragement of innovation in teaching, research, and service; and through provision of a stimulating learning and research environment.

Faculty Recruitment and Appointment

The College Strategic Plan states that Queens College is committed to “Recruit, develop, and retain a faculty of international quality” (Appendix III.5; see also Appendix III.6). GSLIS demonstrates the high priority it attaches to teaching, research and service in both its appointments and promotions. A review of published advertisements for new faculty hires since our last Program Presentation shows a clear expectation of high credentials in all three of these areas. (Appendix III.7). CVs of new faculty hires show that these high expectations are being met. (Appendix III.8)

CUNY has a highly organized set of policies and procedures for faculty appointments. The Office of Compliance and Diversity Programs is quite active in “monitoring recruitment, hiring and employment” (Appendix III.9).  Once permission to begin a faculty search has been granted by the Dean of the Social Sciences Division, and by the Provost and the Office of Compliance and Diversity Programs (OCDP), academic departments can begin to recruit.  Before the OCDP approves each search, it reviews the search plan and meets with the search committee. In addition, the Office of the Provost has policies and procedures related to faculty appointments, which are publicly available (Appendix III.10).

CUNY faculty are represented by a bargaining unit called the Professional Staff Congress (PSC/CUNY).  The current contract can be seen at Appendix III.4. Of particular note is Article 9, which details appointment and reappointment procedures. These details also appear in the CUNY Bylaws (Appendix III.11).

The GSLIS Personnel and Budget Committee (P&B), in common with all other P&B departments at CUNY, is responsible for development of position announcements.  This committee consists of five members, four of whom are elected by the department.  The Director/Chair of the department is the Chair of the P&B.  Prior to the approval of the Dean and Provost, the P&B develops the position announcement for recruitment and submits it to the faculty for its consideration (Further information is provided under “CUNY policy on P and B personnel procedures” in Appendix III.12).

GSLIS makes a strong effort to provide a supportive research and teaching environment for all faculty. Each new faculty member is assigned a mentor who is responsible for providing guidance in teaching, research and publication.  The mentor also facilitates acculturation to the college and departmental environment.  While the mentor is not responsible for progress towards tenure, s/he is usually the first one to identify problems and to attempt to assist in their remedies (See: Appendix III.13, Queens College New Faculty Mentors,).  The regular cycle of teaching and scholarship assessment described at the beginning of this chapter and below, in Standard III.8, provides a regular schedule of feedback to faculty about their strengths and weaknesses. This guidance is intended to foster a climate of research and teaching excellence.

Support for Innovation in Teaching

In addition to the college information technology support staff (Office of Converging Technologies – OCT, Appendix III.14), the Center for Teaching & Learning (CTL, Appendix III.15) and the Educational Technology Unit (Ed Tech; Appendix III.16), support the faculty directly through workshops dedicated to various software packages and new technologies.  CTL and Ed Tech play a key role in both pedagogical and technical support

The CTL has, as its mission, to “recognize, promote, and sustain the quality of teaching and learning at Queens College” (Appendix III.15).  In this capacity, the CTL is a critical player in the various teaching /learning activities of the college.  The GSLIS has recognized the importance of the CTL in support of the learning process. GSLIS faculty have become quite active in the work of CTL, with many of our full time and adjunct faculty actively participating in courses offered, especially in the area of online/hybrid teaching.  

Support for Research

All new Queens College faculty hires receive 8 course releases to be used in their first five years, distributed as they wish. Travel support at QC is modest, with funding for domestic travel limited to $850 and international $1,000 per year, although appeals to the divisional Dean for additional support can be made. In addition to this travel funding, additional funding for international travel has been made (2012) by the Dean’s office and GSLIS has made good use of these funds.

Grants to support research are provided by the PSC-CUNY, the QC collective bargaining unit. These competitive awards are available to all faculty, but are especially targeted to junior faculty. GSLIS faculty have received PSC-CUNY awards, including, most recently, Li, in 2013. The Dean’s office has also sponsored research grants; in 2012 three GSLIS faculty members, Cool, Ng and Li, received such funding. The QC Research Foundation is a valuable support service for announcements about grants, and assistance with applications.

Faculty Fellowship Leaves (Sabbatical)

Tenured faculty and Lecturers with a Certificate of Continuous Employment (CCE) can apply for a one or two semester sabbatical when they have completed six (6) years of service.  An application has to be completed detailing the plans for the leave (Appendix III.17). Effective August 25, 2006, application may be made for: 1) a full-year at 80% of the bi-weekly salary rate, 2) a one-half year leave at 80% of the bi-weekly salary rate, or 3) (on a competitive basis) a one-half year leave at full pay (See Appendix III.17.) Over the period AY 2011 - AY 2014, four GSLIS faculty have been granted Faculty Fellowship Leaves at 80% pay.

Teaching Awards and Innovation

In the past several years, four members of the full-time GSLIS faculty (Chelton, Li, Ng, Perry), and one Adjunct faculty member (Lawton), have been recommended for teaching awards. These awards are campus-wide and highly competitive. Dr. Perry received the Queens College President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching by Full-time Faculty in 2005; she subsequently served on the President's Award Committee for Teaching Excellence for Full-time faculty for three years, two as chair. 

GSLIS faculty continue to develop innovative strategies for enhancing student learning, such as:

Standard III.3

Standard III.3

The school has policies to recruit and retain faculty from multicultural, multiethnic, and multilingual backgrounds. Explicit and equitable faculty personnel policies and procedures are published, accessible, and implemented.

Faculty Diversity 

Both the College Strategic Plan and the Office of Compliance and Diversity Programs (Affirmative Action) are committed to recruiting and retaining faculty from diverse backgrounds.  GSLIS Organizational Goal 3, and the specific Objective: "GSLIS achieves demographic diversity of its faculty, where appropriate, through faculty recruitment policies" directly addresses this Standard, and is in strong compliance with the Queens College position.

In the Fall 2014 semester the GSLIS will have full-time faculty from the following race/ethnicities: one Black, non-Hispanic; two Asian/Pacific Islanders; one white Hispanic. Also worth noting is that, because, at one time, there were discriminatory practices directed towards Italians within CUNY, the University tracks Italian-American faculty as well. The GSLIS has one Italian-American faculty member. In January 2015 the GSLIS faculty will have three Asian/Pacific Islanders. The rest of the GSLIS faculty is self-identified as White/non-Hispanic.

Table III.5 lists policies relevant to this Standard. Policies and procedures are easily accessible on CUNY websites and are administered across the University. These policy documents demonstrate the breadth and depth of our commitment to a multicultural, multiethnic, and multilingual institution (See also Chapter 4 - Standard IV: Students, which relates to these topics).

CUNY Affirmative Action

http://policy.cuny.edu/manual_of_general_policy/article_v/policy_5.04/text/#Navigation_Location

CUNY Disability Accommodation Procedures

http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/ohrm/policies-procedures/reasonable-accommodation.html

CUNY Policies and Procedures on Non-Discrimination and Sexual Harassment

http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/ohrm/policies-procedures/NonDiscriminationandSexualHarassment.pdf

CUNY Policy Time Off For Religious Observance

http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/ohrm/policies-procedures/religious-observance.html

CUNY Workforce Demographics by College, Ethnicity and Gender

http://www.cuny.edu/about/administration/offices/ohrm/WorkforceStatistics/Fall2013FINALCUNYWorkforceDemographicspagenumberedtestoflink03032014.pdf

Table III.5: CUNY Policies and Procedures: Diversity Issues

GSLIS is in compliance with all the legal and institutional policies regarding all aspects of its program, recruitment, hiring, and evaluation of its faculty, staff, student assistants, and adjunct instructors. The University’s official policy on Affirmative Action is found at the sites in Table III.5. Samples of recent job advertisements are found in Appendix III.7.

The Office for Compliance and Diversity Protection considers diversity to include more than demographic variables. Other factors such as Veterans status, intellectual identity and geographical residence are taken by OCDP to be important diversity variables, although at this time there are no formal policies or procedures related to them.

Standard III.4

Standard III.4

The qualifications of each faculty member include competence in designated teaching areas, technological awareness, and active participation in appropriate organizations.

Competencies in Teaching

Competencies in teaching can be demonstrated, and evaluated, in a variety of ways. From Table III.2, in which teaching and research areas are listed for each faculty member, it can be seen that all full-time faculty teach in areas of their research specializations, which supports both competence and currency. The GSLIS conducts peer evaluation of each faculty member's teaching, on regular schedules for the different levels of appointment, with observation of all of the classes taught by each faculty member in a rotational schedule. The results of the observations are the topic of regularly scheduled meetings of each faculty member with the Director/Chair, with resulting proposals for any required action. These observations, and discussions, include comment on course content, course conduct, and use of technology.

Students also serve an important role in the assessment of faculty teaching, through their submission of course and course Instructor evaluations. At the end of every semester students are asked to complete an evaluation for each course taken, which takes into account 7 variables. Table III.6 presents the average evaluation of Full Time Instructors as a whole, across all sections of all courses, for the semesters spring 2011-spring 2014. This table demonstrates that for all semesters covered GSLIS Full Time faculty receive student evaluations above the midpoint rating and in most semesters close to a very high rating of “4”.

Spring 2011

Fall
2011

Spring 2012

Fall
2012

Spring 2013

Fall
2013

Spring 2014

3.9

3.9

3.8

4.1

3.9

3.6

3.8

Table III.6 Average student evaluation score of Full Time Faculty across all sections of all courses. Rating scale: “Overall, how would you rate this Instructor, apart from the course? 1=low, 5=high.”

 

Student course evaluations also ask students to rate the Instructor on the following variables: clarity; interaction, feedback, assignments, availability, readings, difficulty of course; and, evaluation of the course apart from the instructor. Appendix III.23 presents these detailed student course evaluations for the semesters covered in Table III.6, with GSLIS faculty member names removed.

Participation in Scholarly and Professional Organizations

GSLIS Faculty participate actively in a number of different scholarly and professional organizations, and are supported by GSLIS and QC funds, to a limited extent, to participate in these activities.  Table III.7 lists the organizations in which GSLIS faculty are members; Table III.8 specifies participation types for each faculty member. Further details can be found in Appendix III.1, faculty curricula vitae.

Memberships

ALA Library Research Round Table (LRRT)

American Association of School Librarians

American Library Association (ALA)

ARMA International (ARMA)

Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE)

Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T)

Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL)

Association for Library Service to Children

Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies

Association of Vision Science Librarians

Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS)

EDUCAUSE

Freedom to Read Foundation

International Communication Association (ICA)

Modern Language Association

Modernist Studies Association

National Council Teachers of English (NCTE)

New York Library Association (NYLA)

Popular Culture Association

Public Libraries Association

Rare Books and Manuscripts Society

Reference and User Services Association

Society of American Archivists

Society for Eighteenth Century Studies

Special Libraries Association

Strategic and Competitive Intelligence Professionals (SCIP)

Young Adult Library Services Association

 

Table III.7:  Current Memberships of GSLIS Faculty

In addition to memberships in these diverse scholarly and professional organizations listed above, faculty play active roles in the following organizations:

Faculty

Scholarly or Professional Affiliation

Role or Activity

Brody

Strategic and Competitive Intelligence Professionals (SCIP)

Fellows Committee (1992- present)

Fellow Selection Committee, 2014

Chelton

Reference and User Services Association

Young Adult Library Services Association

2012—2013 Member, Readers’ Advisory Research and Trends Committee, RUSA/CODES

2010—Member, YALSA Past Presidents’ Lecture Planning Committee

Cool

ASIS&T

Interactive Information Retrieval in Context (IIIX)

Conference program committee member; member of awards & honors committee; Doctoral student mentor

Program committee for biannual conference, 2012 and 2014

Cooper

New York City School Library System Council

Member

Li

ALA Library Research Round Table (LRRT)

Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T)  

Canadian Association for Information Science (CAIS)

 Shera Awards Committee, 2010

Annual Meeting Program Committee, 2013, 2014

Conference Program Committee, 2012, 2013

 Perry

EDUCAUSE

Participating Representative

Table III.8: Faculty Membership and Participation Activity

Standard III.5

Standard III.5

For each full-time faculty member the qualifications include a sustained record of accomplishment in research or other appropriate scholarship.

Standard III.5 is directly relevant to GSLIS Organizational Goal 2, Objective 2.1, “GSLIS faculty maintain active programs of scholarly and creative production.”

Research and Scholarship of Full time Faculty

Full time faculty vitae show that, on the whole, each member has a record of accomplishment in research/appropriate scholarship.   Table III.9 summarizes full time faculty productivity since date of hire and in the past seven years (since 2007, number in parenthesis in the table below.) Details of publications are found in Appendix III.1, Full time Faculty curricula vitae and Appendix III.3 Adjunct Faculty Curricula Vitae.

Name

Date of Hire

Books &
Other
Monographs

Journal
Articles

Chapters
in Books &
Anthologies

Oral Papers
& Addresses

Reports &
Other Works

Grants

Brody

1996

1 (1)

26 (7)

9 (2)

74 (24)

3

0 (0)

Cederes-Serantes*

2014

0

3

5

13

3

0

Chelton

1998

4 (0)

25 (3)

8 (4)

29 (3)

4 (0)

0 (0)

Cool

1997

3 (2)

16 (3)

18 (6)

31 (6)

3 (0)

2 (1)

Cooper

2007

0 (0)

3 (3)

1 (1)

5 (5)

1 (1)

2 (2)

Kibirige

1985

2 (0)

9 (0)

8 (0)

16  (0)

3 (0)

2 (0)

Li

2006

0 (0)

5 (4)

1 (0)

16  (10)

0 (3)

3 (2)

Marcum

2011

2 (2)

3 (3)

3 (3)

1 (1)

1 (1)

0 (0)

Ng

1999

4  (4)

10  (1)

6  (1)

10  (3)

4 (0)

2  (1)

 Perry

2001

0 (0)

10  (3)

2 (0)

21  (19)

2 (0)

4  (3)

Wu*

2015

0

2

9

1

10

0

Table III.9 Faculty Research & Publications: Since Date of Hire, and Since 2007 (number  in parenthesis ).  *Dr. Serantes will join the faculty in Fall 2014, and Dr. Wu will join the faculty in Spring 2015.

            Table III.9 demonstrates that GSLIS faculty publish and present the results of their scholarly activity in a variety of venues, reflective of the different streams of research and scholarly activity in the LIS discipline. Some faculty find it appropriate to publish in highly refereed conference proceedings rather than in the journal literature, while for others quite the opposite is the case. This table also indicates that overall, GSLIS faculty have records of scholarly accomplishment that are sustained over time; a necessity in a field such as LIS which has an ever changing knowledge base.  For faculty in total, Standard III.5 is met. However, a close reading of the Standard states that “for each full time faculty member the qualifications include…” and here the GSLIS needs to address some gaps in the sustained record of scholarly productivity. The newly created Professional Development Committee is charged with assessing faculty needs in areas of scholarship and teaching and it is hoped that this committee will assist all faculty members to maintain active scholarship records.

Standard III.6

Standard III.6

The faculty hold advanced degrees from a variety of academic institutions. The faculty evidence diversity of backgrounds, ability to conduct research in the field, and specialized knowledge covering program content. In addition, they demonstrate skill in academic planning and evaluation, have a substantial and pertinent body of relevant experience, interact with faculty of other disciplines, and maintain close and continuing liaison with the field. The faculty nurture an intellectual environment that enhances the accomplishment of program objectives. These characteristics apply to faculty regardless of forms or locations of delivery of programs.

Variety of Scholarly Backgrounds

Table III.1 shows the Ph.D. granting institutions for GSLIS full-time faculty. Although there is a preponderance of Rutgers graduates, the number of graduates from other universities, including two Canadian universities, has increased. From that table, it can be seen that our most recent appointments have been of faculty from universities other than Rutgers, and, in contrast to previous experience, from outside the New York metropolitan area. This is a result of deliberate planning to extend the variety of academic backgrounds of the faculty through our recruitment and hiring processes.

Ability to Conduct Research and Specialized Knowledge

Appendix III.1, full time faculty curricula vitae, shows that GSLIS full time faculty regularly contribute to the major research journals in LIS and related areas, as well as to the proceedings of the major conferences in the field. This record also demonstrates that the faculty maintain a "close and continuing liaison with the field", in particular through attendance and contribution to scholarly and professional conferences. It is also the case that the GSLIS faculty actively contribute to the profession, especially through workshops for practitioners and invited presentations at professional organizations. 

Responding to GSLIS Organizational Goal 2, Objectives 2.2 and 2.3, GSLIS faculty are active in the international arena in a variety of ways. For instance, Cool has a visiting teaching appointment at the University of Zadar, in Croatia. Faculty have presented invited lectures at universities in China, Croatia, The Netherlands, and Scotland, and have presented papers at international conferences held in Australia, Canada, China, Croatia, England, Finland, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland and Wales, as well as in significant international conferences held in the USA, such as the annual meetings of International Communication Association and the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T), and the international symposium on Information Interaction in Context (IIiX). Ng and Cool have recently served as editors of the International Journal of Digital Library Systems, and members of the faculty have published in very high quality journals and other venues of international stature, including Archival Science, The Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences, Information Processing and Management, The International Journal of Applied Science and Technology, the Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, the Journal of the ASIS&T, Library Quarterly and School Libraries Worldwide. (Appendix III.1, Faculty curricula vitae)

On a regional level, faculty in the GSLIS, notably Ng and Perry, serve the needs of local constituents by regularly offering workshops sponsored by the Metropolitan New York Library Council (METRO), an organization that is devoted to resource sharing and delivery of career training services for information professionals in the New York City region *. GSLIS has had a presence at METRO for over 15 years, offering two and three day workshops on the following cutting edge technologies: Essential WordPress for Librarians, JQuery and Ajax for Librarians, XML for Librarians, JavaScript and DOM, and Digital Imaging (See Appendix III.21 for an example of a workshop offered by our faculty for METRO, password protected site, username: qcgslis ; password: 7189973790 ).

Skill in Academic Planning and Evaluation

All of the members of the GSLIS full-time faculty regularly participate in the Student Learning Outcome (SLO) Syllabi Matrix evaluation, described in Chapters 1 and 2. This activity, and its results in the regular updating and other revision of the courses in the Curriculum, demonstrate the faculty members' skill in academic planning and evaluation.

Interaction within Queens College

Faculty collaborate with those in other disciplines within Queens College, CUNY.  Within the Division of Social Sciences, the newly developed proposal for a joint MA in History/MLS degree is a strong example. Dr. Cooper regularly interacts with faculty in the Division of Education. In recent semesters GSLIS faculty have played a role in the development of the Data Science track within the Division of Social Sciences.

Our faculty are highly visible in College governance and on key committees in the College and in the University, serving on the Queens College Graduate Curriculum Committee, the College Personnel and Budget Committee, the Executive Committee of the College Personnel and Budget Committee, as Chair of the Academic Senate and as senators on the CUNY University Faculty Senate. One faculty member has been serving as Chair of the Queens College Policy Board on Administration. Dr. Cooper is a member of the Queens College Education Unit's ​Professional Educational Council. In the past, Dr. Perry served as Acting Director of the Center for Teaching and  Learning at QC.

Faculty Service

In addition to their service on various Queens College and CUNY committees, as described above, and in professional organizations as indicated in Table III.8, all GSLIS faculty serve on at least two standing committees of the School. The standing committees of the GSLIS are:

The GSLIS places a high degree of emphasis on service. With the exception of the Personnel and Budget Committee, to which the Department elects faculty for a three year term, committee appointments are made on an annual basis. Faculty acquire a considerable amount of information and experience during their participation in committees. This is particularly so with the CET Committee, which plays an essential role in the functioning of the Program. In addition to committee membership, most faculty members also coordinate core, LMS, and certificate courses to maintain the continuity and quality of instruction across multiple sections.

Standard III.7  

Standard III.7

Faculty assignments relate to the needs of a program and to the competencies and interests of individual faculty members.  These assignments assure that the quality of instruction is maintained throughout the year and take into account the time needed by the faculty for teaching, student counseling, research, professional development, and institutional and professional service.

 

Table III.2, in which teaching competencies and research interests are listed, and Tables III.7 and III.8, which list faculty professional and scholarly organization membership, give an overview of the relationship between teaching assignments and faculty members’ areas of competence and expertise. A more explicit source of evidence is in Appendix III.22, which specifies all of the courses taught by each faculty member since Spring semester 2011. Faculty specializations include coverage of all core/required courses along with advanced and specialized courses in digital technologies, digital humanities, web programming, database construction, management of academic libraries, human computer interaction, business information sources, competitive intelligence, geographic information systems, information systems analysis, knowledge management, readers advisory, youth literacy, graphic novels, archival appraisal, history of the book; children’s book art; children and young adult materials and services.

Highly qualified adjunct faculty offer specialization in areas outside the expertise of full time faculty and therefore contribute to overall teaching talent of the GSLIS. These areas of expertise covered by adjunct faculty include advanced reference services; digital preservation; records management; art librarianship and legal librarianship. (Appendix III.3 and Table III.3)

Standard III.8

Standard III.8

Procedures are established for systematic evaluation of faculty; evaluation considers accomplishment and innovation in the areas of teaching, research, and service. Within applicable institutional policies, faculty, students, and others are involved in the evaluation process

Regular evaluation of faculty achievement across the areas of teaching, research and service involves many parties including the Personnel & Budget Committee; the Director/Chair; the Planning Committee; the Professional Development Committee; faculty mentors; students; and, to a lesser degree, the Dean of Social Sciences, the Provost and the President of Queens College.

Faculty evaluation and assessment activities take place in the following manner:

·         Every Semester: Personnel & Budget Committee discusses matters related to individual faculty; pre-tenure cases are evaluated and discussed; tenure and promotion cases (when applicable) are processed; problems/issues are brought to the attention of the Committee.

·         Every Semester: Classroom teaching evaluations and mentorship reports are delivered to the P&B Committee, Director/Chair, and faculty member observed. Adjunct and untenured faculty have classroom evaluations every semester; tenured faculty at rank of Associate Professor every year; Full Professors are evaluated at the discretion of the Director/Chair. All full time faculty participate in these peer observations, but only evaluate others at or below their rank. The Director/Chair follows up with faculty members who are observed.

·         Annually: Faculty productivity is assessed through the formal process of the Professional Evaluation Interview Schedule Form (Appendix III.26), which takes stock of professional accomplishments in teaching, scholarship and service; this is submitted to the Director/Chair, who writes up an annual evaluation which is reviewed with the faculty member, then sent to the Dean, who follows up with a letter to the faculty member, and submits upward to the Provost and President. Faculty mentors submit annual reports to P&B and Director/Chair on their mentees, which are incorporated into annual evaluations of pre-tenure faculty. Specifics of the annual reviews are detailed below.

            As mentioned above in this chapter, students play an important role in the assessment of faculty. Every semester they are requested to submit course evaluations for each course they take (Appendix III.20. This form needs student ID to logon.) Indirect assessment of faculty comes from Exit Interviews with graduating students and our Alumni Surveys. The Assessment Coordinator has responsibility for collecting this data and passing it along to the CET and the P&B. In recent surveys of graduating students and alumni, faculty are perceived to be a real strength of the program.  (Appendix III.24 and  Appendix III.25, respectively).

Faculty Review and Reappointment

For pre-tenure faculty, the departmental P&B meets in the Fall semester to discuss reappointments for the next academic year.  A written evaluation containing a recommendation to reappoint/not reappoint is prepared and sent to the Dean.

On an annual basis, usually towards end of the Spring semester, the Director/Chair writes an evaluation of all full-time faculty, except for tenured Full Professors. This process is initiated by a request from the Director/Chair to faculty members who are not Full Professors to complete a Professional Evaluation Interview Schedule (PEIS) (Appendix III.26). This is then submitted to the Director/Chair to inform the written evaluation. An analysis of progress towards tenure and/or promotion is made, along with guidance and future expectations. This analysis includes a discussion of teaching based on classroom observations and student evaluations. The annual evaluation is accomplished both in the written document, and in a conference of the Director/Chair with the faculty member. The faculty member has the right to challenge any point that is in contention. A copy of this evaluation is sent to the Dean who submits an evaluation to the Office of the Provost. All materials go into the faculty member’s personnel file (Appendix III.27, available in office.)

All tenure track faculty must come up for tenure in the fall of their seventh year, unless application for early tenure is approved by the Departmental P&B. (See Appendix III.28,  for Promotion Process Candidate's Curriculum Vitae and Personal Statement. The tenure and promotion process is described in detail at http://www.qc.cuny.edu/about/administration/Provost/FacultyStaff/Pages/Full-time.aspx 

Briefly, the tenure process proceeds as follows.

  1. One or more semesters before the tenure decision, the Director/Chair informs the tenure candidate that he/she will be considered in the Fall of the next academic year.
  2. The candidate assembles his/her evidence files and related forms.  This usually takes place during the Spring into the early Summer.
  3. The Director/Chair compiles a list of potential six (6) to eight (8) outside evaluators in consultation with the candidate, and then contacts each reviewer to solicit comments about the candidate.
  4. At the beginning of the Fall semester of the seventh year of service, the P&B examines the evidence provided by the candidate, and the external letters, and votes on the candidate's suitability for tenure.  The vote is recorded and an evaluation memo is written by the P&B. The Director/Chair writes an additional evaluation.,
  5.  The P&B report and decision, the evaluation by the Director/Chair, and all evidence and letters are submitted to the Social Sciences Division P&B, which consists of all of the Chairs of the Division, and is officially called the Divisional Advisory Committee. The Dean of Social Sciences convenes discussions on each candidate and the Committee votes for/against tenure.  The Provost is informed of the results of each vote for informational purposes only. 
  6.  The Social Science Division Chairs elect two members to serve on the Committee of Seven (two members each from the Social Sciences Division, Arts and Humanities Division and the Mathematics and Sciences Division.  The Education Division elects one member).
  7. The Provost schedules a meeting of the Committee of Seven in which each candidate is evaluated.  The Provost acts as Chair but does not engage in the discussion unless specific factual information is required. The results of the Committee of Seven deliberations are sent to the President.
  8.  The President schedules a vote on all of the candidates for a regular College P&B meeting, which consists of all of the Academic Chairs in the college. A vote is taken on all candidates in an executive session of the College P&B Chairs, recorded and presented to the President.
  9. The President reviews the candidates and approves or denies tenure for each one.  The President then sends the list of candidates, with his decision, to the Chancellor.
  10. The Chancellor reviews the list and submits it to the Board of Trustees who “officially” grants tenure to the candidate. If tenure is not recommended, the candidate is informed by the Dean. Should the candidate wish to appeal this decision, a process is initiated by writing to the Dean. The process concludes with a decision from the President.

Faculty Promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor

At CUNY, the granting of tenure, and the related promotion to Associate Professor, are considered separately. Although the most usual case is that the two are accomplished in tandem, it is possible for a candidate to be granted tenure, but not promotion, and, in rare cases, usually before the seventh year of service, to be promoted without tenure. In general, the procedures outlined above regarding Tenure are similar for Promotion.  The tenure documentation is returned to the Dean from the Office of the Provost after the College P&B votes. In those cases where an Assistant Professor has been denied promotion, the Departmental P&B reviews the case on an annual basis.  At the Assistant level only the Departmental P&B can recommend promotion. 

Summary

Evidence presented in this chapter demonstrates that the GSLIS meets ALA Standard III. GSLIS Organizational Goal 2 and its Objectives list specific achievement indicators that have proven useful in meeting all of the elements of Standard III.

As a group, faculty:

 However, overall faculty workload is high. With a high teaching load and high expectation of service commitment, faculty find that time for research and scholarly writing is limited. The Director/Chair is working with the College Administration to obtain additional course release time for extended service commitments and additional part time help for administrative functions and research assistance. An increase in communication between GSLIS Director/Chair and QC Administration has resulted in greater understanding of the unique needs of GSLIS as a department and a school; notably, in areas of support for additional personnel to participate in activities related to ongoing assessment activities (discussed further in Chapter 5).

On a further positive note, since our last Comprehensive Review QC Administration has been very supportive of faculty needs. This is most evident in the recent hiring of two new faculty members, in a tight budget climate at the College and CUNY overall. Furthermore, GSLIS faculty are being supported by secondment to GSLIS from the Queens College IT staff of a one-half time IT staff member, who has been instrumental in supporting faculty computing and software needs for both teaching and research, and for infrastructure upgrades in the GSLIS teaching labs (discussed further in Chapter 6). Furthermore, this person manages the part time lab assistants for GSLIS student labs and serves as an adjunct lecturer in the core course LBSCI Introduction to Information Technology. He serves as GSLIS web master as well. Clearly, a challenge for GSLIS faculty as we go forward is to establish an understanding with Administration about the ongoing needs of GSLIS faculty in order to be sustainable and to maintain the current level of support for faculty needs. This is especially important as we confront faculty retirements in the upcoming years.

GSLIS has been successful in hiring one new faculty member (Cedeira Serantes) who will help to ensure the continuation of our highly enrolled Certificate in Children’s and Young Adults Materials and Services in the Public Library after the future retirement of Dr. Chelton. A pressing need for GSLIS is the hiring of a full time faculty member to oversee the Certificate in Archives and Preservation of Cultural Heritage Materials, after the departure of Dr. Alexander in August 2014. GSLIS is currently working with the Queens College Administration, in consultation with the Head of Special Collections in Rosenthal Library, to address this situation.